C.I.S.'s Nuclear Facilities

Aleysk

SS-18 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

52.480715°N, 82.736278°E

Arzamas-16 (Sarov)

The former super-secret atomic weapons city of Arzamas-16 (sometimes nick-named "Los Arzamas") is the principal Russian nuclear weapon laboratory. For over 45 years Sarov disappeared from the map, to reappear under its original name of Sarov after the collapse of the Soviet Union.

54.918165°N, 43.318405°E

Barnaul

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

53.551731°N, 83.809204°E

Bershet-Perm

Former SS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile site.

57.691442°N, 56.302314°E

Chelyabinsk-65 / Mayak

Mayak Chemical Combine is located near Ozersk, a closed city in the Southern Urals. Until 1992 the city was known only by its post office box number Chelyabinsk-65, and prior to 1990, as Chelyabinsk 40. There used to be six operational reactors for the production of weapons plutonium. Of these, five were graphite-moderated while the sixth was originally a heavy water reactor. The graphite-moderated reactors have now been shut down. There is a reprocessing facility (RT-1) in use at Mayak, a vitrification facility for liquid waste and about 100 storage tanks containing high level radioactive waste.

57.28952°N, 60.087318°E

Dombarovskiy

SS-18 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

51.078508°N, 59.754639°E

Drovyanaya

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

51.521455°N, 113.037643°E

Engels

The Tu-160 Blackjack bombers at this base are armed with air-launched cruise missiles, short-range attack missiles and gravity bombs.

51.481169°N, 46.214848°E

Irkutsk

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

52.324429°N, 104.37973°E

Kansk

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

56.263185°N, 95.649719°E

Kartaly

SS-18 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

53.300826°N, 60.399742°E

Kostroma

Former SS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile site.

57.842981°N, 41.236088°E

Kozelsk

SS-19 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

53.797406°N, 35.801697°E

Krasnoyarsk

Former SS-24 intercontinental ballistic missile site.

56.122974°N, 92.242928°E

Krasnoyarsk-26

Krasnoyarsk-26, currently Zheleznogorsk, was established in 1950 to produce plutonium for weapons. The facility's original name was the Combine 815. At present it is known as the Mining and Chemical Combine. A distinctive feature of the plutonium production complex in Krasnoyarsk-26 is that the reactor plant, radiochemical plant, laboratories, and storage facilities are located 200-250 meters underground, in a multi-level system of underground tunnels inside a mountain

56.366011°N, 93.624458°E

Moscow ABM Site 1

SH-08 Gazelle and SH-11 Gorgon anti-ballistic missiles are stationed at this site. This site is allowed under the ABM treaty.

55.625815°N, 37.3895°E

Moscow ABM Site 2

SH-08 Gazelle and SH-11 Gorgon anti-ballistic missiles are stationed at this site. This site is allowed under the ABM treaty.

55.878332°N, 37.893777°E

Moscow ABM Site 3

SH-08 Gazelle and SH-11 Gorgon anti-ballistic missiles are stationed at this site. This site is allowed under the ABM treaty.

55.901267°N, 37.308047°E

Moscow ABM Site 4

SH-08 Gazelle and SH-11 Gorgon anti-ballistic missiles are stationed at this site. This site is allowed under the ABM treaty.

55.576549°N, 37.771232°E

Mozdek

The Tu-95M Bear-H16 and Bear-H6 bombers at this base are armed with air-launched cruise missiles and gravity bombs.

43.782373°N, 44.604235°E

Nerpichya

Submarines at this site are armed with SS-N-20 submarine-launched ballistic missiles.

69.438511°N, 32.414818°E

Nizhniy Tagil

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

58.043004°N, 60.406952°E

Novaya Zemlya

Novaya Zemlya was the site of extensive Soviet atmospheric and underground testing, including the largest thermonuclear device ever tested, a 58 megaton air-dropped bomb detonated October 23, 1961. Of the 42 underground explosions at Novaya Zemlya, 25 were accompanied by release of radioactive inert gases. There were three underwater explosions, each less than 20 kiloton, but most of the radionuclides remained in the water and sediments. A total of 17 reactors were dumped in the Barents Sea, to the west of Novaya Zemlya, including seven containing spent nuclear fuel.

73.390781°N, 54.755859°E

Novosibirsk

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

55.274031°N, 83.011322°E

Okolnaya

Submarine-launched ballistic missiles are stored at this site.

51.151678°N, 37.751427°E

Ostrovnoy

Submarine-launched ballistic missiles are stored at this site.

68.075228°N, 39.462032°E

Revda

Submarine-launched ballistic missiles are stored at this site.

67.937524°N, 34.562988°E

Rybachy

SS-N-6, SS-N-8, and SS-N-18 submarine-launched ballistic missiles are stored at this base for operational and decommissioned submarines.

52.918322°N, 158.499327°E

Semipalatinsk

Site of hundreds of Soviet atmospheric and underground nuclear tests. Also the site of the first Soviet nuclear test on August 29, 1949.

50.410706°N, 80.252724°E

Sverdlovsk-44

Sverdlovsk-44 / Novouralsk Combine 813 / Urals Electrochemistry Combine, currently Novouralsk, was established in 1945 to produce highly-enriched uranium for the nuclear weapons program. It is the oldest and largest uranium enrichment facility in Russia.

57.289527°N, 60.087318°E

Sverdlovsk-45

The closed city of Sverdlovsk-45, currently Lesnoy, was established in 1947 as a home to the Plant 418 – an electromagnetic separation (calutron) facility to produce HEU. An industrial-scale separation facility, SU-20, was completed at the Plant 418 simultaneously with the Soviet first gaseous diffusion plant D-1 in Sverdlovsk-44. In the late 1950s, a portion of the Plant 418 was adopted to house a nuclear warhead assembly/disassembly facility

58.650736°N, 59.770947°E

Tatischevo

SS-19, SS-24 and SS-27 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

56.892504°N, 40.578003°E

Tomsk-7 Plutonium and Uranium Production Facility

The Siberian Chemical Combine (SKhK), located in Seversk (formerly known as Tomsk-7), is one of the principal nuclear materials production sites in the MINATOM complex, with uranium processing facilities, production reactors, a spent fuel reprocessing plant, a uranium enrichment plant, and a variety of other processing and storage facilities. Tomsk-7 was established in 1949 to produce and process fissile materials for the nuclear weapons program.

56.619693°N, 84.888783°E

Ukrainka

The Tu-95M Bear-H16 and Bear-H6 bombers at this base are armed with air-launched cruise missiles and gravity bombs.

51.167827°N, 128.443651°E

Uzhur

SS-18 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

55.080726°N, 89.815979°E

Vipolzovo

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

57.86448°N, 33.616791°E

Yagelnaya

SS-N-8, SS-N-18, and SS-N-23 submarine-launched ballistic missiles are stored at this base for operational and decommissioned submarines.

69.261347°N, 33.335738°E

Yoshkar-Ola

SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missiles can be launched from this site.

56.556455°N, 48.048019°E

Yurya

Former SS-25 intercontinental ballistic missile site.

59.070213°N, 49.299774°E

Sources: Federation of American Scientists, Center for Non-Proliferation Studies, and Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

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